Posts Tagged ‘GameStop’


Do you have extra Gamecube games, systems or accessories laying around that you want to get rid of?  Well if you do you might want to boogie on down to your local GameStop and dispose of them sooner than later.  Starting April 2nd GameStop will be adding the Nintendo Gamecube to the long list of systems they will not be accepting trades for.  Just like other systems before the Gamecube this is done to free up inventory space for newer merchandise which is understandable.  Also when a system is proverbially black listed GameStop has been known to run a sale on the platform’s games, accessories and hardware.  So there might be some good to come of this, but until then I can only speculate.  So like I said earlier, sell them while you can and as always you can follow us on Twitter @GamersAbstract and like us on Facebook for more content.

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In 2009 a movie by the name of Daybreakers hit theaters and offered up a unique twist to the modern vampire tale.  A virus had spread through the world reducing the human population to almost extinct levels and vampires were the preeminent species on Earth.  While it was a tale of survival for the human race an underlying theme of commerce resonated throughout the film.  The main protagonist Edward Dalton (Ethan Hawke) was tasked with creating a blood substitute that would help sustain the vampire population in light of the dwindling human source.  Various scenes throughout the movie showcased the immense need for such a breakthrough and that this “blood substitute” would be the solution all vampires were looking for.  So you might be wondering what in the hell does this have to do with video games or digital media?  I assure you some clarity is approaching.  Nearing the film’s conclusion the main antagonist Charles Bromley (Sam Neill) said something very profound along the lines of “even though we will have a working blood substitute, there will still be customers who are willing to pay for the real thing”.  While the quote isn’t exact it is essentially implying that even though a blood substitute would be a solution for all, there would still be those not satisfied and would pay more for human blood (also implying that humans would still be hunted and farmed).  This statement is in regards to something that hopefully never happens, but runs parallel with the debate between digital and physical media and the gaming landscape at large.

Would you pay more for the real thing?

Video game companies are not that much different from the fictitious Bromley Marks corporation (albeit they don’t hunt humans, yet).  The actual form of the video game has changed drastically in recent times and with that change raises the question of how will games be delivered and consumed in the future.  They are looking at current retail establishments and seeing how they can sustain with the giant obstacle, that is used games, standing in their path.  With used games continuing to be a huge part of video game sales for retailers, publishers are scrambling to reduce and eventually eliminate that market entirely.  Online passes and day one DLC has given incentive to some, but there are still plenty who wait for a cheap used copy to surface at GameStop.  We all know video games are a business like any other form of media, but eliminating physical media entirely would ostracize from what I can only assume is still a large part of the gaming community.  As crazy as it might sound there are still people who don’t have high speed internet or live in areas where the service simply isn’t available, so an entirely digital platform would cripple their ability to purchase and enjoy new titles.

The digital option, stressing the option part

Both digital and physical media offer great benefits and drawbacks and those still warrant choice from the consumer.  This dichotomy amongst consumers usually boils down to pricing and how that pricing is structured.  The costs associated with both forms of media are apparent and consumers of each already accept these terms (knowingly or not).  If I want to pay an extra $20 for a game with a case, box art, jacket and physical disc with that new game smell I should be able to.  Conversely if someone wants to pay $20 less and get the same game, but in digital form they too are free to do such.  Choice is paramount and is something that must always exist.  If one form were to monopolize the market a great disservice would beset the gaming community.

Physical games, will they remain an option?

As a consumer driven society it is one of our many duties to keep choice alive.  Choice keeps competition healthy and also keeps companies accountable for their products’ quality (well at least some of the time).  Digital media is a solution that would satisfy some, but for those of us that prefer the real thing we understand that we will have to pay more.  I am not looking for price equality and for those who want to go digital and pay less are entitled to that discount, but for the people like me, physical media should still be an option.  I hope that the events of Daybreakers never come true, but I do hope that video game publishers understand that two communities of consumers will always exist and moving forward they need not marginalize either of them.

If any portion of this article moved you, please sound off in the comments section and let me know how you feel about this debate.  It is an important topic and it will affect all of us in one way or another.  As always you can follow us on Twitter @GamersAbstract and like us on Facebook for more content.


Last night I felt the urge to go to GameStop and peruse the store (which happens often), but to my delight they had a PS Vita demo unit out for use.  So what was supposed to just be a short outing turned into me getting my first hands on experience with Sony’s new handheld.  While I didn’t get to fully explore the Vita I feel like I got a pretty good showcase of what the system is capable of so let me share my thoughts with all of you.

The design is very similar to that of the PSP which made it very comfortable to use and even with a security cradle attached to the system it was still very light, which is a plus.  The face and shoulder buttons are once again identical to that of the PSP, but the major additions come in the form of an additional analog stick, front touch screen, rear touch panel and a camera.  Dual analog sticks were something PSP owners wanted out the gate, but even through two system redesigns were never integrated so prospective Vita buyers fear not.  While the dual analog sticks are a great design addition they are very small and depending on how they are integrated into various pieces of software could potentially pose a problem for users with large hands (such as myself).  One other caveat with the analog stick design is that if a game uses the rear touch panel and both sticks it could potentially make the Vita a bit cumbersome to use hypothetically speaking (you would literally be clutching just the outside of the system and would be putting extra pressure on the sticks).  Enough with the design jargon let me tell you about the software I played.

The system had quite a few demos loaded on it, but due to time constraints (i.e. store closing) I only had the opportunity to play Gravity Rush and Uncharted: Golden Abyss.  Both games were a blast to play and it reaffirmed in my mind that dedicated handheld systems still have a place in the video game industry.  Gravity Rush has a great art style with quirky characters and the gameplay mechanics were beyond unique.  If I had the available funds to purchase a Vita at launch Gravity Rush would absolutely be a day one purchase.  Uncharted: Golden Abyss was a treat as well, but it wasn’t anything that players haven’t already experienced in the previous three entries (sans some touch integration).  Nonetheless Golden Abyss is setting the bar really high out the gate for graphics on the Vita and makes me very optimistic about the visual fidelity games will present down the road.  Like I said earlier I wasn’t able to fully explore the other demos available or any of the other features that were on the display unit so I apologize if this seems inconclusive.

The PS Vita is a cool piece of tech that will definitely please those who are purchasing it day one and will be a great device for people to save up for.  I unfortunately fall into the latter category, but it will be a glorious day when I can get my hands on one of my own.  In the meantime many more trips to my local GameStop will be in order until that day arrives.  Also if this article piqued your interest head to your local GameStop to see if yours has a demo unit and give it a spin; if you are a fan of handheld systems I promise you it won’t disappoint.  As always you can follow us on Twitter @GamersAbstract and like us on Facebook for more content.  If you get a chance to check out the Vita sound off in the comments section and let us know what you think.


Do you own a Nintendo 3DS?  Do you plan on getting the Circle Pad Pro when it launches early next year?  Lastly, do you live in North America?  If you answered yes to all of three questions you will need to know this in order to purchase it (if no then I’ll allow you to stop reading).  The Circle Pad Pro is an attachment for the Nintendo 3DS that adds an extra thumb stick and shoulder buttons to the console and will reportedly have limited support working with only select 3DS titles (Resident Evil: Revelations and Monster Hunter 3G are confirmed).  That is its main function, but in order to buy this attachment you will have to shell the $20 asking price over to GameStop.  According to a Gamasutra article I read, the Circle Pad Pro will be sold exclusively through GameStop in North America and is being done so as an initiative to reduce the amount of potential extraneous units floating around at other retailers.  That same article also mentioned about how this isn’t Nintendo’s first rodeo with doing something of this sort.  Nintendo also did this with Electroplankton and Chibi Robo!Park Patrol for the DS.

I think that anything Nintendo can do to reduce the risk of over manufacturing these attachments is an excellent idea.  Having them at one retailer will almost guarantee that they will only produce what is either pre-ordered or requested from the retailer.  I think this is a win-win for everyone and will surely keep Nintendo from dipping further into the red.  What do you think of this act on behalf of Nintendo?  Do you think it is a good/bad idea?  Do you wish you could purchase it at your choice of retailer?  Sound off in the comments section and let us know what you think.  As always you can follow us on Twitter @GamersAbstract and like us on Facebook for more content.